Book Notes
Mckibben, Bill. The End of Nature, 1989. book
Miamichi
book   Introduction
  Part One:  
    Chapter I, pp 3-45.
  entitled "A New Atmosphere"
    Chapter II,  pp. 47 - 91
  entitled "The End of Nature"

          

 

Part One:

 

Sunset on Sundown Bay, by William T. Ely, 2005.

A New Atmosphere

 

America ate more food than it grew in 1989

5

pH and the implications for water, soil bacteria, vegetation, animals & you

7

oil like coal is a fossil fuel that drives our economies.

10

5.6 pounds of carbon for every gallon we burn / consume

11

 

1957 paper Revelle & Suess

12

 

the chemistry of infrared absorption.

13

"a drag-race that is getting faster all the time,"

13

 

deforestation -- wilderness

14

 

pasturage for stock

15

 

feedback loop

17

 

thesis         "we have substantially altered the earth's atmosphere."

18

 

Keeling curve

19

 

models, doubling of carbon dioxide from pre-industrial times,  & James Hansen

20

 USA severe drought in the 1980s (freezes in Fla,)

23

The warming signal was now apparent 1988 drought and 81-83 warm years

24

George Will on Al Gore as an example of retrograde thinking

       1988 problems with 1975 thinking

26

May 1989 Hansen - Congress round II

more CO-2 means more heat scientifically valid

29

 

"accepted scientific wisdom"

29

 

Potential feedbacks are:

31-35

 

trees die / climate warming -- even insect infestations  Woodwhell -- nuanced signs

 

dead trees release carbon

35

 

1964-1979  1/2 Vermont red spruce trees were dead

37

8% of all German forests damaged

37

pH of normal rainfall plummeted American West  and China

37

 

Ozone loss and the meaning for ultraviolet radiation impacting photo-sensitive

38

 

Lovelock and the Gaia -- self-regulating        

compare to Nash nature as self willed.

40

 

1985 Vienna Convention

42

 

"staggering" effects of CO2 and Ozone hole -- on the planet

44

 

Chapter II  pp. 47 - 91

Adirondack Stream

An Adirondack Mountain Stream, by Ms. M. Dearmas, 2006.

"The End of Nature"

 

The sound of the chain saw breaks the silence of the woodlands...

 

"but it does drive away the feeling that you are in another, separate timeless, wild sphere."

47

We have changed the atmosphere, and that will change the weather."

47

"and a walk in the woods will be changed."

47

"An idea, a relationship, can go extinct, just like an animal or a plant."

 

"it turned out that the carbon dioxide...we were producing in our pursuit of a better life....

      could change the patterns of moisture and dryness, breed storms in new places, breed deserts."

 

"...but the meaning has already changed.

48

 

The argument that nature has ended is complex;

 

49

Bartram found vigorous beauty,

 

50

Paul Brooks Speaking for Nature, wilderness had a negative imagery until 1800s

50

 

Such Visions of the world as it existed outside of human history became scarcer with each year that passed.

 

Bob Marshall 1930s

52

 

"Marshall was very near  the last to see surrounding unpolluted even by the knowledge that someone had been there before."

53

"But still we feel the need for pristine places, places substantially unaltered by man."

 

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is ANWR

55

'deep-rooted desire for pristine places is the decision...to legislate 'wilderness'

 

"life ... untrammeled by man"

55

"not easy to segregate wilderness" – large tracts of land remote and unadulterated

 

DDT

Carson

56

"This idea of Nature is hardy"

57

 Lyn Jacobs the battle to restrict grazing in the west

57

"But now the basis of that faith is lost."

58

 

In the far reaches of the arctic "what its supposed to be , or whether , thanks to the extra carbon dioxide, you are standing in the equivalent of a heated room."

59

 

"but he won't ever see a natural stream."

60

 

"Not man! Nature!

 

"spoiled by the maggots that work in the mind"

E.B.White on Gardens and nuclear fallout in the 1960s

61

 

62 (53 class edition)

"Thoreau, complaining about the logging that eventually destroyed...hide its nakedness" from deforestation 1840s-50s

62

 

"first huge rupture  in the globe's history"

 

Lovelock

Margulis

63

Contents PART Pages
xv
Part I The Present
3
47
Part II The Near Future
95
139
171

 

 

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